NEWS

Christmas cat care – what’s best for your feline friend?

21st Nov 2019

Christmas cat care – what’s best for your feline friend?

Are you planning on spending this Christmas away from your home in Northamptonshire? If so, it’s always tough deciding what best to do with your pet – particularly cats, who are not keen travellers.

Simon has some recommendations which may help you determine which option is best for you and your cat. And remember, you can always talk to our expert team if you want more advice.

Ask us for cat care advice

1. Friend or neighbour

GOOD POINTS:

  • This is usually the cheapest and least disruptive option.
  • Your cat may be familiar with the person and therefore feel comforted.

BAD POINTS:

  • Your cat may get lonely and stressed if it’s left alone with only brief visits from a stranger. A stressed cat may urinate around the house or worse, leave home completely.
  • An amateur cat sitter might not notice subtle behavioural changes or signs of your cat being unwell. Plus, if your cat is on medication, consider whether your visitor can administer it effectively.

2. Professional pet sitter

GOOD POINTS:

  • Some pet sitters will stay in your house, so your cat will have company and your home gets cared for.
  • At the very least, a good cat sitter will visit once or twice a day to check your cat, feed it, clean litter trays and give medications if necessary. This should reduce stress all round.

BAD POINTS:

  • This option can be expensive.
  • Some people are uncomfortable with having a stranger in their house (so your pet sitter should either be recommended by someone you trust, or be pre-checked by an agency).

3. Cattery

GOOD POINTS:

  • Catteries should have good professional care standards– including giving lots of attention, the right food and appropriate medication.
  • They are normally cheaper than cat sitters and it’s great for cats who like the company of other people and cats.

BAD POINTS:

  • A cat who doesn’t like being confined, or other cats, may be better off at home.
  • The standards of care in catteries vary, so ask lots of questions when you check the cattery out.

Still not sure what to do?

If you’d like more advice, get in touch with our vet nurses, who will be happy to talk through the options and what might work best for you.

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